le Samedi 28 mai 2022
le Mercredi 8 avril 2020 15:44 Autres - Others

Rainbow hope treasure hunt

This piece of “rainbow art” is almost big enough to see from the sky. Kim (left) and Carolyn Joiner, a mother-daughter artistic tag-team show just how big their message of thanks and hope to essential workers. The chalkwork art piece occupies almost all of the driveway in front of the Joiner residence in Embrun. — photo Nigel Joiner
This piece of “rainbow art” is almost big enough to see from the sky. Kim (left) and Carolyn Joiner, a mother-daughter artistic tag-team show just how big their message of thanks and hope to essential workers. The chalkwork art piece occupies almost all of the driveway in front of the Joiner residence in Embrun.
photo Nigel Joiner
In Embrun homebound children can go hunting rainbows of hope thanks to Kim and Carolyn Joiner and others with an optimistic and artistic frame of mind.

“This was something I saw on Facebook,” said Kim Joiner during a phone interview April 2. “I read where children were going to do a ‘treasure hunt’ and find as many rainbows as they could.”

The “rainbow treasure hunt’ in the Joiner’s neighbourhood and other parts of the village involved some homeowners posting pictures of rainbows, most of them of the children’s colouring contest variety, in their windows or on their front doors to help brighten the neighbourhoods and lift people’s spirits during the current pandemic situation.

Kim Joiner is a teacher at L’académie de la Seigneurie in Casselman. She is homebound now as all of Ontario’s schools are closed as part of the provincial government’s health emergency measures to contain the spread of the COVID-19 virus. She welcomed the “rainbow treasure hunt” as a way for her, and also her daughter, Carolyn, to occupy themselves at home.

“I figured I’d ‘go big’ and do something for the kids to see and talk about,” Kim said.

First thing Kim did was to paint rainbows on the inside of the front windows of her home. That occupied some time during the last week of March when the weather was often cold and rainy.

But when April 1 dawned warm and sunny, she and Carolyn grabbed their sidewalk chalk and went outside and created their masterpiece, using their 30-foot-long driveway as the canvas. The end result was a huge rose-pink heart and the words “Merci travailleurs essentiels” in rainbow colours above and below the heart.

“While we were working on it,” Kim said, “some people came out and said ‘Thank you for encouraging us.’ It made us feel good that they felt recognized.”

The family driveway has space for four cars and the grand artwork of Kim and Carolyn covered almost all of the asphalt. When they were done, they waited to see and hear the reaction of passersby.

“You could see them pointing,” said Kim Joiner, chuckling, “and you could hear the kids screaming ‘Mom! You gotta see this one!”

Nigel Joiner, Kim’s spouse, climbed up on the garage roof to get a photo of the masterpiece, with his wife and daughter both on their backs on either side of the heart, to show just how big the huge chalk drawing was. The next day’s rain washed away the artwork but the mother-daughter duo already have plans for another outdoor art session when the weather is sunny and the asphalt is dry.

“They still have a fair amount of chalk,” Nigel said, laughing.

“My daughter wants to do another chalk drawing, with a different message,” Kim said.

“I think it’s really cool,” said Carolyn. “I think it turned out really good.”