le Vendredi 9 Décembre 2022
le Lundi 3 octobre 2022 15:58 | mis à jour le 5 octobre 2022 18:16 Non classé

Walk of Sorrow on Truth and Reconciliation Day

La deuxième marche de la tristesse et rassemblement de Clarence-Rockland a eu lieu vendredi dans le cadre de la célébration par la municipalité de la Journée de la vérité et de la réconciliation. Les résidents ont marché de la rue Laurier au parc Du Moulin sur la rivière des Outaouais. — Joseph Coppolino
La deuxième marche de la tristesse et rassemblement de Clarence-Rockland a eu lieu vendredi dans le cadre de la célébration par la municipalité de la Journée de la vérité et de la réconciliation. Les résidents ont marché de la rue Laurier au parc Du Moulin sur la rivière des Outaouais.
Joseph Coppolino
Residents, councillors and city staff gathered at Parc Du Moulin to observe national Truth and Reconciliation Day to participate in a Walk of Sorrow.

Starting at Laurier Street, participants marched in silence donning orange shirts down Edward Street toward Parc Du Moulin accompanied by Indigenous drummers. Bylaw and Ontario Provincial Police blocked off streets allowing the procession to proceed. City councillors Samuel Cardarelli and Kyle Cyr showed their support along with Clarence-Rockland Mayor Mario Zanth. 

Organized by Helen Pace and the team at the Indigenous Grassroots Circle, after the walk participants gathered to listen to Mohawk elder and Rockland resident Gerry Villeneuve and Hereditary Chief Jason Arbour. Educational materials were on site, food was shared, a traditional hoop dancer performed and a sacred fire was lit in memory of victims and survivors of Canada’s residential school system. 

Though observed since 2013, the Day for Truth and Reconciliation became a statutory federal holiday in 2021 after thousands of unmarked graves were uncovered near the former sites of residential schools.